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Tag Archives: The Daily Beast

Storytelling for the win: This year’s ASME finalists

This year’s National Magazine Award nominations in the features, multimedia, reporting and essay/criticism categories cover conflict, immigration, violence, grief, the abortion wars and more, from a host of talented journalists representing a range of publications. The American Society of Magazine Editors will announce the winners on May 1, in New York. Read the full list [...]

Pinned: Wells Tower, James Agee, Jill Lepore, David Foster Wallace, John Jeremiah Sullivan, Jennifer Egan, Sylvia Plath

Pinned this week, for your storytelling pleasure: Interviewland: Wells Tower talked to Bookforum about alternating between the worlds of journalism and fiction. When asked what he makes of longform’s new popularity he said, “It’s good news for all of us that early reports of the death of literary magazine writing appear to have been overwrought. [...]

What he gave: Richard Ben Cramer

When Richard Ben Cramer died Monday, at 62, of lung cancer, the outpouring of grief and gratitude began immediately. It’s hard to find a narrative journalist or a serious political writer that Cramer didn’t influence with What It Takes: The Way to the White House, his 1,047-page saga of the 1988 presidential race, or with [...]

New Niemans and their stories: Meet the Class of 2013

The first week of fall term ends today at Harvard, and the Nieman Foundation’s newest class of fellows is settling in. The Nieman fellowship, which next year will celebrate its 75th anniversary, brings together 12 U.S. and 12 international journalists for one year of study across the university. Fellows pursue the topics of their choice, [...]

“Why’s this so good?” No. 11: Tom Junod on Mister Rogers and grace

When I was living in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina and came back sometime later to see what was left, one of the things I found was the November 1998 issue of Esquire magazine. The cover with Mister Rogers on it was faded, and the pages were worn thin from rereading. There may have been [...]

The Guardian essay on Hindu super-temples? It might be news to you (and me)

Talking about narrative journalism, The St. Petersburg Times’ Lane DeGregory once told me

“One of the stupidest stories I ever did had the biggest response. It was an ‘up all night’ piece about what happens between midnight and 6:00 am. I had all these old ladies calling me up and saying, ‘I’m never up that late, and I didn’t know about any of this.’ It was so gratifying to take readers someplace.”

Taking readers someplace they are unlikely or unable to go is a prime service narrative can provide. Witness these two nicely done but very different stories:

[caption id="attachment_972" align="alignleft" width="101" caption="Abhinav Ramnarayan"]Abhinav Ramnarayan[/caption]

Supermarket, superstores—why not a supertemple? “The Many Gods of Ilford,” a Guardian trend essay on multi-god Hindu temples in former recreation centers, touches on religion and tolerance while revealing that cockroaches can evoke nostalgia. A few useful posted comments about disability, caste, and monotheism add to Abhinav Ramnarayan’s original piece.

Over at The Daily Beast, Tim Mohr’s “Did Punk Rock Tear Down the Wall?” looks at the East German ’80s punk scene and recounts the career of Die Anderen (“the Others”), a band that straddled the East-West divide.

What other keyhole views into history or a community have generated memorable narratives? We’d like to hear from you.